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Coding from home 3: Remote robotics, 21-day coding challenge and computer science education in Croatia on the agenda of the webinar

Around 50 participants from Belgium, Croatia, Estonia, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Portugal, Sweden and Tunisia took part in the 3rd Coding from Home webinar on 6 April 2020.

Lidija Kralj, Assistant Minister for Strategy & General Education from Croatia presented remote computer science lessons. Maura Sandri, Leading Teacher from Italy, Paulo Torcato, Leading teacher from Portugal and Imen Taktak, Code Week Ambassador from Tunisia shared robotics and coding activities

for remote learning they have developed. 

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Lidija Kralj described how remote learning was organised
following the Covid-19 lockdown of schools in Croatia. In the past
two years all schools and teachers have been equipped with computers and tablets,
which made the roll-out of the remote teaching rather smooth. After the
lock-down, virtual classrooms were established for all principles, teachers and
their students. The ministry has also established channels for teachers,
parents and students to use.

Maura Sandri presented a 21-day coding challenge that she created to get kids, parents and educators to start coding, explore computational thinking and have fun. The coding challenges were uploaded online every morning at 10 o’clock and every evening Maura and her team checked and commented on the programmes that had been submitted. Maura has also developed an astro-documentary activity in Scratch that will soon be translated into English.

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Paulo
Torcato
presented Scratch and basic school robotics remote
lessons that he has created for children and parents. He also showed examples
were he had combined robotics and science classes. He underlined that his
coding classes always are combined with other
subjects
such as Portuguese, maths,
science and English. 

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Imen
Taktak,
Code Week ambassador Tunisia – presented three different
remote activities
for schools. The first was focused on “Netiquette
or Cyberethics. The second activity was about robotics where the students described
a micro:bit card its components and utilities and then coded a traffic light
remotely. The third activity focused on climate change where students used
micro:bits to create simple weather stations. The full presentation is available online.

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Coding from home 2 – Focus on practical tips for online teaching, Coding bingo and a Coding treasure hunt

By Annika Östergren Pofantis, EU Code Week team

Be realistic. Be patient. Be kind to yourself. Adapt. Four tips from Ana Stamatescu, Romanian Code Week ambassador and education coordinator at TechSoup to teachers around the world who are starting to teach their classes online. Ana shared her experience on remote teaching together with Madhumalti Sharma, Code Week Ambassador Luxembourg and EU robotics national coordinator, Pauline Maas, Leading Teacher the Netherlands and Stefania Altieri Leading teacher from Italy at the second EU Code Week “Coding from Home” webinar Tuesday 24 March.

Ana encouraged teachers to start by picking two to three tools and testing them with your students. “Change if they are not suitable for you”, she said. Ana’s favourites are Zoom for online classes, Kahoot for interactive quizzes as well as the more traditional WhatsApp, Facebook and YouTube. She also encouraged teachers to talk seek support from their local teaching communities. “If you need help, don’t be afraid to ask for it”. Ana’s presentation is available here.

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Take a cookie break!

Madhumalti shared some practical tips for people who are moving their coding workshops online:

  • Use conference tools such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams, GoToMeetings. Some are available for free for education and teachers.
  • If bandwidth allows keep all participants’ cameras on so children feel connected.
  • Invite participants to share their screen to show their projects.
  • Use mute/unmute, raise hand features.
  • Take a break – like in real class allow for a short break with fruits and snacks.
  • Record the session and share references.

She underlined that parents are welcome to join, but mostly children can manage on their own. The youngest may need help to set up the conference tools, but quickly get independent. Madhumalti’s presentation is available here.

Coding bingo and coding treasure hunt

Pauline shared her online activity Coding bingo, which includes activities ranging from baking muffins and talking about input and output, to pixel art to the Sandwich robot man where you program your parent/teacher!

Stefania shared her coding treasure hunt, which is inspired by Trivial Pursuit, where all questions are linked to coding. Read more in this blog post.

See the recording of the webinar here.

Join Coding from Home on 27 March at 11.30 CET

A third Coding from home webinar will take place on Friday 27 March 11.30 CET. Speakers include

Lidija Kralj. Assistant Minister at Ministry of Science and Education, Croatia; Imen Taktak, Code Week ambassador Tunisia on a robotics; Maura Sandri, Leading Teacher Italy on a 21-day coding challenge and Paulo Torcato, Portuguese Leading teacher on Scratch and basic school robotics.

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Coding from home – Practical tips and good practices to organise remote classes

By Annika Östergren Pofantis, EU Code Week Team

Stay in touch with students. Make the most of existing on-line
resources. Use cloud tools.  Provide structure and respect the school’s
time schedule. These were Alessandro Bogliolo’s, Italian EU Code Week
ambassador and professor at University of Urbino, tips for teachers organising
lessons remotely at the first EU Code Week
Coding from Home webinar.

Alessandro
said that coding is a quite easy to introduce remotely and encourage teachers
to make the coding activities as fun as possible. He, for example, suggested
teachers to propose daily activities and games that the children can play with
their families. Alessandro himself organises coding lessons for families in cooperation with Italian TV RAI.

Deborah Elalouf, French Code Week ambassador, shared the Code-Decode online training path available in English and French that aims to help
participants understand coding and digital culture.

Francisco Javier Masero Suarez, Leading teacher from Spain, showed a
practical example of a remote lesson combining karate and coding

(see presentation on Google Drive or Slideshare). He underlined
that although students are at home they need to do physical activities. He
said that combing coding and sports allows students to develop cognitive and
physical activities in the same project.

See the recording of the webinar here.

A second Coding from home webinar will take place on Tuesday 24 March
15.00 CET. Speakers include Ana Stamatescu Code Week Ambassador Romania,
Madhumalti Sharma, Code Week Ambassador from Luxembourg,  Pauline Maas,
Leading Teacher Netherlands on unplugged coding And Stefania Altieri, Leading
Teacher Italy on online coding game.

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Original online coding treasure hunt from Italy

By Annika Östergren Pofantis, EU Code Week Team

Stefania Altieri is one of the Italian Leading teachers. She developed an original online coding treasure hunt for her students so that they can work  and learn online when schools are closed. She now invites all teachers and students around the world to try it out!

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The game is inspired by Trivial Pursuit, but in Stefania’s treasure hunt all quizzes and tests are about coding and programming linked to other subjects.

For each part you solve, you get a letter. To win, you need to make a word out of all the letters.

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This simple treasure hunt helps teachers to offer engaging activities to students who cannot be physically present at school. If you know or have developed similar activities, share them in the EU Code Week Facebook group for teachers!

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A look back on the Code Week 2019 Student Meet: developing projects to protect the environment in Malta

During Code Week 2019,
students from Malta, Finland and Spain participated in an online meeting where
they presented the Code Week activities they had participated in and talked
about their overall Code Week experience

In Malta, Sarah, Andrea, Jacob and Chloe
developed a project centred on the need to protect the environment, learning to
work with Scratch and then building their own prototypes. In Finland, Sofi and
Rasmus taught other students, did the CodyColor
Battle Royale and an Hour of Code project. Lucía, Sara and Laura from
Spain designed a video game in Scratch, and designed and created a Joystick with Makey
Makey
and inexpensive
materials.

In this blog post, we learn more about the
students’ and teacher’s experience in Malta, with teacher James Callus and
students Sara, Andrea, Jacob and Chloe.

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James, you are Sarah,
Andrea, Jacob and Chloe’s teacher. Could you along with your students tell us
more about the activities organized in your school during Code Week 2019?

James: During the first part of their
project, students used the Scratch Junior App to create a dialogue. Their
objective was to make the other students in their school aware about the
importance to look after our environment.

Jacob: While creating my dialogue in Scratch
Jr. I was all the time thinking about all the things we can do to save our
planet. It makes me very sad to think about all the animals that might become
extinct due to climate change.

Sarah: We wanted to find a solution to environmental problems
and decided to build a robot, which will help us to look after the environment.
We will discuss our ideas with all the students during assembly. Maybe one day
our dream will come true and our robots will really help future generations to
look after the environment.

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James, how do you
think that this project or activities that you have done with your students
help to develop your students’ skills or competences?

James: First by working together as a
group and conducting research about climate change and the environment, they learned
to collaborate and gather new knowledge. Together they created a project in
Scratch Jr in which they did a digital story together. Then they focused on
building the robot, which involved interpersonal skills. They had to
communicate, plan, to construct and code together. These are all competences, I
think, are necessary for today. And they were really excited and a lot of ideas
came out throughout the project.

Andrea: I really enjoy using my school
tablet to create digital stories. When I create  stories, I always think about different ways
to improve my work. Scratch Jr. is one of my favourite apps since I can code to
make my characters move on screen.

Are parents supportive
of these kind of activities?

James: Yes, parents are very supportive. Last
year, we started Family coding in school and at the public library. We had so
many people interested that we couldn’t meet all the demand. This year we are
going to repeat the same programme where parents, together with their children
are invited to school after school hours. The Family Code nights are the first
step towards that direction and I can assure you that it’s fun seeing parents and
children, and sometimes even grandparents, coding. It’s an experience I cherish
it and I look forward to next year’s event.

What is the impact you
have seen in your students when you work with this kind of activities to learn
about the environment?

James: First of all, with robotics and with
Scratch Jr. I like watch them think, collaborate, discuss and create things.
And most importantly, they use coding to create something that works that they
have planned together. That is the most rewarding part of every project.

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What would you say to teachers who might be
considering using Scratch in their classroom with younger kids?

Chloe: Scratch Jr. is very easy and fun
to use and I would like to tell all the teachers in the world to encourage
their students to start coding with Scratch Jr. They should use Scratch Jr. so
the students can make their own stories and make them feel like they are
writing their own book. And they can code and they can make all the characters
move, talk, they can even disappear. It’s encouraging for students to know when
they grow up they could learn how to code and it is really useful.

James: Start as soon as possible. Plan
small projects first and let the children explore, be autonomous and discover
the tool themselves to create more engaging stories which they can share with
their class and the rest of their schools. Coding is for everyone! Coding is
for all and coding is fun!

Are you interested in knowing more? Head over
to the full Student Meet here!

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A look back on the Code Week 2019 Student Meet: students become coding teachers in Finland

During Code Week 2019,
students from Finland, Spain and Malta participated in an online meeting where
they presented Code Week activities they had participated in and talked about
their overall Code Week experience

In Finland, Sofi and Rasmus participated in
various activities from a CodyColor Battle Royale to an Hour of Code
project. Lucía, Sara and Laura from Spain designed a video game in Scratch and
created a Joystick. In Malta, Sarah, Andrea, Jacob and Chloe developed a
project centred on the need to protect the environment, learning to work with Scratch and then building their own
prototypes.

In this blog post, we learn more about the
students’ and teacher’s experience in Finland, with students Sofi and Rasmus
and their teacher Anu Kahri in a short interview.

Sofi and Rasmus, could
you tell us more about the activities organised in your school during Code Week
2019?

Sofi: We got the opportunity to teach
other classes how to do CodyColor and also doing it ourselves. When
you step on a red square you turn 90° right, when you step on a yellow square
you turn 90° left and when you step on a grey square you take one step forward.
Most of the work during the week was group work. We only worked individually
when doing CodyColor Battle Royale or code.org activities on the computer. And on
the Hour of Code
we actually helped each other a lot.

Rasmus: We even tried playing CodyColor on
a 12*13 squares with the whole class competing. Before this we were teaching
two other classes which also got to try to play on the 12*13 squares.

Anu, how would you say
that what your students have learned is relevant for them?

Anu: Even if they only got a glimpse of
what coding could be they learned that it is all around us and everywhere. I
think the most important thing they probably learned was working together as a
group. They also got a lot more confident because they had the opportunity to
teach, which was a really big motivation boost for them. In this project, the
advantages and the skills they’ve learned are probably a little bit outside of
coding but there is coding integrated into it.

Sofi: For me, the project was very
motivating because I learned new things, coding was fun and there was no
homework. It was something else that ordinary school work and it got me off
normal classes.

Rasmus: I think group work is an important
skill for life that you will always need! We also got more motivation for
learning new things. And we got a glimpse that coding is all around us. If you
didn’t know your left and right before the project you should have learned it
by now. If you wanted you could have a red dot on your hand because when you
step on a red square you should turn 90° right.

What is your best
memory of this project?

Anu: I think one of the best parts was
the night school where we came back to school at 17.00 and a lot of parents joined.
It was fun competing with parents on Battle Royale and beating them was the
best. Later on the parents left and the students and I spent the night at
school. And since coders always eat a lot of pizza, we had pizza and we
continued with pixel colouring, coding and we had games at school, running
around, and sleeping in the gym together.

Have you encountered
any challenges during the project? What would you say to teachers who are
thinking of making the step?

Anu: Many times, teachers say they don’t
have time for stuff like this. Obviously, we took some time away from math, English
and other classes, but I do not think they are missing anything, but actually learning
a lot more. This is what I try to tell teachers. Scratch Jr.
is, for example, a great tool for English or Finnish classes because you use it
to write and read stories. You can take a lot of stuff from your other subjects
and just do it through coding, where you catch two flies at one time. My last
tip for teachers is that: you should take advantage of the kids because usually
the things that teachers are nervous about or scared of, the children are not.

Sofi: If there is a teacher that is
planning to do this kind of project but is too scared students could say ‘I can
come and help you!’ or ‘Believe in yourself!’, this could help your teachers’
motivation. If it does not work you could explain the instructions very clearly
or you could say ‘think that there is no one there, what would you do?’

Anu: Exactly, I often tell teachers
when I give ICT training course that they should allow the students to help
them and that they shouldn’t worry. You don’t need to know it all! The kids
will help you. Many adults are scared of pressing a button, but the kids are
not scared of trying new things and they can learn very well on their own. All
of my students became tutors this year within the Cody project.

Are you interested in knowing more? Head over
to the full Student Meet here!

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A look back on the Code Week 2019 Student Meet: students lead video game design in Spain

During Code Week 2019,
students from Malta, Finland and Spain participated in an online meeting where
they presented Code Week activities they had participated in and talked about
their overall Code Week experience.

In Spain, Lucía, Sara, Laura and Rebeca designed
a video game in Scratch and created a Joystick. Sofi and Rasmus from Finland participated
in various activities from a CodyColor Battle Royale to an Hour of Code
project. In Malta, Sarah, Andrea, Jacob and Chloe developed a project centred
on the need to protect the environment, learning to work with Scratch and then building their own
prototypes.

In this blog post, we learn more about the
students’ and teacher’s experience in Spain, with students Lucía, Sara and
Laura and their teacher Conchi Fernández in a short interview.

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Could you tell us more about the objective of
your activities?

Conchi: Our project has two main objectives.
The first objective is to develop computational thinking using Scratch and design a simple video game. For
the video game, the students give ideas and execute orders. The second
objective is to develop manual skills creating a prototype of a Joystick that
we connected with the Makey Makey board. It’s always amazing to
create your own objects. This type of project encourages creativity as the
children design their own products with really simple and cheap material.

Lucía and Laura, can you describe your experience?

Lucía: I really enjoyed working on this project
because we had much fun doing it. We worked in a small group that made
everything entertaining. Thanks to this, we learned many things about
technology and ways to use it, and have fun doing it. It is also a new way to
communicate with our teacher. He or she can help you but you can also teach him
or her to do something.

Laura: I have learned to work in a team
and help my classmates as needed. In addition, the activity was more fun with
friends. Working as a team has led us to make decisions and develop ideas
together. For that we needed to develop our communication abilities and help
each other to improve ourselves.

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Sara, what would you
tell teachers that are interested in this kind of activities?

Sara: I would tell them that they should
do this kind of activity because it is a different and fun way to learn and to
develop technological skills. It is more entertaining because you learn in a new
way and students and teachers can work together on the same project. I
recommend it because you learn a lot of new things. Last year, for example, I
learned how to work with Makey Makey and now I can use this knowledge with my
own class.

Conchi: I think it is very important for
students to do things like this, not only in class, but also in workshops and
outside school, because it is really interesting and fun and you can make
friends. I think it is really cool!

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Do you have a message
for your colleagues?

Conchi: Don’t be afraid with coding. Don’t
panic! Learn from your students. Learn together! Mistakes are part of the
learning process. Even though you are wrong there is always something positive!
The most important is to work on a small concrete project. The result is not
important. It is about the process, not the finish of the process. Select one
idea and go!

Are you interested in knowing more? Head over
to the full Student Meet here!

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Look back on the Deep Dive MOOC – Module 5: Coding for All Subjects, App Development and CS Fundamentals

Back in October, over 4200 teachers enrolled in
Code Week’s Deep Dive MOOC. This free online course offered teachers the
opportunity to get familiarized with coding and coding related principles and
gain the knowledge and confidence to organize fun, interactive and educational
coding activities with their students. The course was organized into 5 modules,
with each focusing on a particular aspect of coding, such as computational
thinking, unplugged activities, and the endless possibilities of robotics, tinkering
and making, visual programming languages, app creation and so much more. It
allowed teachers to discover how easy and fun it can be to bring coding to
their classroom, as coding is for everyone and can be incorporated into any
subject or curriculum. Most importantly, teachers were given the knowledge,
resources, and encouragement needed to get them coding with their students.

Module 5: Coding for
All Subjects, App Development and CS Fundamentals

For the final module, participants got to see
just how cross-curricular coding can be, with ideas of how-to bring coding into
all lessons, from foreign languages to arts and even physical education. There
was something for everyone! As always, an array of resources such as videos and
ready to use lesson plans were introduced, and participants were encouraged to
share ideas and resources and most importantly try them out in their
classrooms. That was just the beginning! The participants went on to learn
about app development and how to get their students designing their very first
app. With all of the concepts, ideas and examples learned in the MOOC, it was
time for participants to take part in the Code Week 4 all challenge, share and
learn from one another, and even organize and carry out a hackathon and a remote
lesson.

Coding and computational thinking activities can easily be integrated
into the classroom,
regardless of the subject you teach or your previous experience.

Keep reading to see some outstanding examples
of activities done by some of our participants.

Getting Loopy by Jasna, Croatia

In this module, great discussions took
place about integrating coding into different subjects, with the arts and
foreign languages teachers especially enthusiastic about sharing their ideas. For example, Jasna, an English teacher from Croatia asked her
students to write a simple code that represents dance movements. Students then
turned these series of movements into loops and translated their codes into a
real-life dance.

Football code by Natasa, North Macedonia

Another great unplugged activity came from Natasa, who used a grid to ger her students
to code their way along a football pitch and score a goal. What a great way to
get your students moving as well as interested in coding through their
favourite sport!

Escape room game by Eirini, Greece

A popular idea for making your coding
class cross-curricular is creating an escape game for your students. Here you
can include all types of different challenges that can relate to any subject. Eirini
gave coding puzzles to her students in this series of challenges integrated into
an escape game.

After taking this
course, 97% teachers agreed the course made them more confident to implement
coding activities in the classroom, and they have gained practical ideas on how
they can improve their professional expertise. If you want to do the same, you
are still on time! Even though the course is no longer moderated, you can still
access
all the different modules of the course
, watch the live
events recordings and improve your teaching practice by having a look at the
different ideas and advices thousands of teachers have shared throughout the
course.

Do you want
to see more innovative activities and get plenty of ideas for your classroom?
Join our Facebook group, where teachers share ideas and
material every day, and follow us on Facebook and
Twitter!

Be sure to check out our website https://codeweek.eu/training to get access to free training material and
lesson plans.

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Look back on the Deep Dive MOOC – Module 4: Robotics, Tinkering and Making

Back in October, over 4200 teachers enrolled in
Code Week’s Deep Dive MOOC. This free online course offered teachers the
opportunity to get familiarized with coding and coding related principles and
gain the knowledge and confidence to organize fun, interactive and educational
coding activities with their students. The course was organized into 5 modules,
with each focusing on a particular aspect of coding, such as computational
thinking, unplugged activities, and the endless possibilities of robotics,
tinkering and making, visual programming languages, app creation and so much
more. It allowed teachers to discover how easy and fun it can be to bring
coding to their classroom, as coding is for everyone and can be incorporated
into any subject or curriculum. Most importantly, teachers were given the
knowledge, resources, and encouragement needed to get them coding with their
students.

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Module 4: Robotics,
Tinkering and Making

In Module 4, the robots took over,
as participants learned how robotics, tinkering, and making can be integrated
into the classroom to help students learn in an engaging and meaningful way.
Once again, teachers learned about the endless benefits of robotics, from
helping students develop skills such as teamwork and collaboration, to getting
them career ready. Participants shared their experiences with robotics, shared
ideas, and even found partners to collaborate with on their next robotics
project. The module finished on a practical note, with concrete examples of
tinkering and robotics activities, like step by step instructions to build a
mechanical hand or create a conductivity-based game. As always, plenty of
resources were provided, like lesson plans, videos and tips to “get coding”.

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Keep reading to see some outstanding
examples of activities done by some of our participants.

Clean water hackathon by Iwona, Poland

In this activity, another inspiring teacher,
Iwona, organised a two-day workshop for her primary school students to address
issues of clean water and sanitation using coding. Hacking the Sustainable
Development Goals is not a new concept, and it is relevant for our students, as
these are the types of problems they will be facing as adults. Interacting and
discussing with experts in in the field brings the reality of the issue even
closer to the students, so Iwona also invited experts on the topic.

Next level Pixel-art by Xristina, Greece

Xristina took the popular
pixel-art activity to the next level, adapting it well to the topic of this
module, tinkering, and making. She asked her students to give each other
instructions on how to fill a set of cups in order to create a picture. Take a
look at these pictures of the activity to see how even the simplest
idea can be made exciting !

Milo the Science Rover by Anca, Romania

Using 10 Lego WeDo2.0 sets, Anca
challenged her students to build a science rover. The classroom suddenly turned
into a laboratory of scientists and engineers, as students felt like they were
working on a project for NASA. They even performed experiments to test the
stability of their devices. How amazing!

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You can
watch other examples of activities here.

After taking this
course, 97% teachers agreed the course made them more confident to implement
coding activities in the classroom, and they have gained practical ideas on how
they can improve their professional expertise. If you want to do the same, you
are still on time! Even though the course is no longer moderated, you can still
access
all the different modules of the course
, watch the
live events recordings
and improve your teaching practice by having
a look at the different ideas and advices thousands of teachers have shared
throughout the course. If
you have any question about the course, you can contact Naír Carrera, the
course coordinator, here.

Do you want
to see more innovative activities and get plenty of ideas for your classroom?
Join our Facebook group, where teachers share ideas and material
every day, and follow us on Instagram,
Facebook and Twitter!

Be sure to check out our website https://codeweek.eu/training to get access to free training material and
lesson plans that you can already use to register your activity in the map and participate in Code Week 2020!

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Look back on the Deep Dive MOOC – Module 3 : Visual Programming Languages, Scratch & Co.

Back in October, over 4200 teachers enrolled in
Code Week’s Deep Dive MOOC. This free online course offered teachers the
opportunity to get familiarized with coding and coding related principles and
gain the knowledge and confidence to organize fun, interactive and educational
coding activities with their students. The course was organized into 5 modules,
with each focusing on a particular aspect of coding, such as computational
thinking, unplugged activities, and the endless possibilities of robotics,
tinkering and making, visual programming languages, app creation and so much
more. It allowed teachers to discover how easy and fun it can be to bring
coding to their classroom, as coding is for everyone and can be incorporated
into any subject or curriculum. Most importantly, teachers were given the
knowledge, resources, and encouragement needed to get them coding with their
students.

Module 3 : Visual
Programming Languages, Scratch & Co.

Next, it was time for the
participants to really delve into the world of coding through an introduction
into visual programming languages like Scratch. Here in Module 3, they learned a
bit about the history of visual programming, along with its advantages and
disadvantages. Then it came time to show teachers the programming tools they
can use in their classrooms and the various easy and fun activities they can
try with their students, like creating an educational game. The participants
had the opportunity to participate in the live event, with Code Week ambassador
from Germany, Matthias Loewe, who provided help and expertise on “How to create
your own game in one hour”. Most importantly, teachers were encouraged to
explore and try out the lesson plans found on the Code Week website with their
students and share their ideas and experiences with each other.

Keep reading to see some outstanding
examples of activities done by some of our participants.

AEPAS using scratch! Personal
identification by Ana, Portugal

We see many teachers taking their first steps
in coding by starting with simple unplugged activities first, such as pixel art,
and then moving on to experimenting with Scratch in the classroom. Ana came up
with an innovative way to teach her students
English
, such as
introducing yourself or sharing details, by programming short dialogues with
Scratch. In this way, she managed to bring together coding and language
learning through a fun activity. What she learned from her
experience is to not get discouraged if you need to practice a couple of hours before
your lesson, it will be worth it when you see each of your students active and
enthusiastic!

Looking for colour by Jelena Mandic, North Macedonia

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Jelena posted her unplugged activity for
pre-primary or early primary school students on the Code Week Teachers’
Facebook group. With the guidance of pre-coded schemes, students had to move
along a grid to find their colour. Simple and fun, even for the youngest!

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Francisco Javier Masero Suarez, Spain

Francisco might just win our imaginary medal: he teaches
karate lessons to his pupils using Scratch. In his class, students design a set
of movements called ‘kata’ using Scratch. Throughout this process, students
internalise the flow of movements and can then easily perform them in the gym
later on. Keep inspiring Francisco!

You can
watch other examples of activities here.

After taking this
course, 97% teachers agreed the course made them more confident to implement
coding activities in the classroom, and they have gained practical ideas on how
they can improve their professional expertise. If you want to do the same, you
are still on time! Even though the course is no longer moderated, you can still
access
all the different modules of the course
, watch the
live events recordings
and improve your teaching practice by having
a look at the different ideas and advices thousands of teachers have shared
throughout the course. If
you have any question about the course, you can contact Naír Carrera, the
course coordinator, here.

Do you want
to see more innovative activities and get plenty of ideas for your classroom?
Join our Facebook group, where teachers share ideas and material
every day, and follow us on Instagram,
Facebook and Twitter!

Be sure to check out our website https://codeweek.eu/training to get access to free training material and
lesson plans that you can already use to register your activity in the map and participate in Code Week 2020!